Business Administration and Computer Science Course Master's Programs

Business Administration and Computer Science course
An integrated business graduate school offering a comprehensive education in management, information, and finance
In addition to developing the required skills in corporate management and decision-making, our master’s program gives students a broad-based education that covers all aspects of business, from fundamental and applied information systems knowledge to capital and finance.

Areas of specialization

Management Systems
The Management Systems curriculum can be positioned in three different ways. The first involves understanding the overall makeup of managed entities through shared core courses in macroeconomics, microeconomics, principles of management, management organizations, international management, management strategy and the management systems through which those strategic actions are primarily carried out, and the quality management systems that address not only finished product quality and product production quality, but overall management quality as well. The second is in terms of academic research on systems that perform individual functions without getting stuck at the current level of functioning. The specialist courses in this area are production management systems, human resource management, logistics systems, marketing management, and technology management strategy. Thirdly, the Management Systems curriculum is a study of management mathematics science, or applying engineering techniques and mathematical science to various decision-making problems and challenges. Specialist courses those in operations research and decision-making. This area also includes courses in venture business and systems management, where students learn how to create the new businesses that are desperately needed as a form of recovery strategy for the Japanese economy and to revitalize local economies as well. Students build on their basic courses and what they learn in the Information Systems and Financial Systems areas, taking special seminars and research courses as well as working in internships to gain the comprehensive abilities and leadership qualities they need to put their information processing skills, decision-making skills, and management skills to work identifying and resolving the myriad problems and issues that arise in the modern workplace.
Information Systems
The structure of the Information Systems curriculum is unique in that it gives students a primary education in software technology with the computer fundamentals course, developing their basic abilities with a focus on the development of innovative information systems technologies as a core skill for use in the management systems and financial systems areas. It covers the mathematical programming and applied statistics critical as a shared foundation for all three areas of information science, the databases that underlie information system computers and networks, and then networks, and then the reliability information to protect these information systems as well as network information. Students also work with information security, intelligent information computing, media computing, information systems theory, software design, computer graphics, communications and computing, safety systems, computer vision–all essential technologies that integrate modern management systems, financial systems, and information technologies together. Students build on their basic courses and what they learn in the Management Systems and Financial Systems areas, taking special seminars and research courses as well as working in internships to gain the comprehensive abilities and leadership qualities they need to put their information processing skills, decision-making skills, and management skills to work identifying and resolving the myriad problems and issues that arise in the modern workplace.
Financial Systems
Our Financial Systems curriculum asks students to investigate and analyze the flow of capital and finances through managed entities. The core building block courses are management accounting, financial accounting systems, and financial statements. With consolidated accounting at the heart of today’s global business operations, there is also a need for students to study international accounting. Next, they move on to courses like business analysis, cost performance analysis, and cost accounting in order to analyze and interpret managed entities’ yield as well as published data sources and information. The audit course ensures that even when financial information is published, students are able to objectively guarantee that it is true and fair. A financial management course satisfies the need for a class that deals particularly with financial products, derivatives, and the like. Finally, to address the large-scale risks now associated with management activities involving capital and finances, students study risk management and internal controls. The entire curriculum is set up to offer the courses students to cover the topic of in financial systems in a way that recognizes our rapidly changing business climate and the progress of globalization. Students build on their basic courses and what they learn in the Management Systems and Information Systems areas, taking special seminars and research courses as well as working in internships to gain the comprehensive abilities and leadership qualities they need to put their information processing skills, decision-making skills, and management skills to work identifying and resolving the myriad problems and issues that arise in the modern workplace.
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